Installing sockets in the bathroom: basic rules

Installing sockets in the bathroom: basic rules

Accord­ing to the “Elec­tri­cal Instal­la­tion Rules” (PUE), the bath­room is divid­ed into zones 0, 1, 2, 3. Zone 0 is locat­ed inside the bath bowl or show­er tray. Zone 1 is the space above zone 0. Zone 2 is an area 60 cm wide adja­cent to zone 1. Zone 3 is the vol­ume bound­ed by the out­er sur­face of zone 2 and a ver­ti­cal sur­face locat­ed at a dis­tance of 240 cm from it. Zones 1–3 reach a height of 225 cm from the floor.

In the bath­rooms of apart­ments, it is allowed to install sock­ets with a volt­age of 220 V only in zone 3. More­over, all elec­tri­cal instal­la­tion prod­ucts must have a mois­ture pro­tec­tion class of at least 4. In prac­tice, this means that the sock­et hous­ing is able to with­stand indi­vid­ual splash­es. Such sock­ets in the bath­room are sup­plied, in par­tic­u­lar, with pro­tec­tive shut­ters.

Installing sockets in the bathroom: basic rules

Installing sockets in the bathroom: basic rules

Any switch­es and sock­ets must be locat­ed at a dis­tance of up to 60 cm from the door­way of the show­er cab­in. All elec­tri­cal instal­la­tion prod­ucts must be con­nect­ed to the net­work through iso­lat­ing trans­form­ers or be equipped with a resid­ual cur­rent device (RCD) that responds to dif­fer­en­tial cur­rent, the strength of which does not exceed 30 mA. In prac­tice, RCDs are usu­al­ly used, since iso­la­tion trans­form­ers are less con­ve­nient. Trans­form­ers are usu­al­ly used to con­nect elec­tri­cal equip­ment of low pow­er (50–100 W).

For devices with a pow­er of 2–2.5 kW, an iso­lat­ing trans­former of sol­id dimen­sions, weigh­ing 15–20 kg, will be required; its cost can reach sev­er­al tens of thou­sands of rubles. House­hold RCDs are designed for dif­fer­ent leak­age cur­rents (10 and 30 mA). It is best to use one RCD with a high leak­age cur­rent to con­nect and pro­tect the entire apart­ment, addi­tion­al­ly sup­ply­ing indi­vid­ual pow­er lines in the bath­room with sev­er­al small­er RCDs (for exam­ple, one for a wash­ing machine, anoth­er for a sock­et, a third for a light­ing line).

Installing sockets in the bathroom: basic rules

Bath­room sock­ets are in the col­lec­tions of almost all man­u­fac­tur­ers of elec­tri­cal instal­la­tion prod­ucts. So, for exam­ple, in the Jung Schuko line, there is a mod­el with a hinged lid (with a return spring) and pro­tec­tion against con­tact with con­duc­tive ele­ments. And when using an addi­tion­al seal­ing mem­brane, the degree of pro­tec­tion IP 44 is achieved. Sock­ets must be con­nect­ed via a three-core cable, a sin­gle-core cable is also laid for addi­tion­al poten­tial equal­iza­tion (safe­ty require­ment for rooms with high humid­i­ty). The device is ground­ed by the third con­duc­tor of the cable (yel­low-green), which is con­nect­ed to the ground­ing con­tact of the mech­a­nism. It is not safe to use two-wire cabling in bath­rooms.

Denis Fila­tov

Lead­ing Design Engi­neer of Build­ing Automa­tion Sys­tems, Viart Light­ing Com­pa­ny

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